Rosenstein to testify in Senate on Trump-Russia probe

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

A key figure behind the U.S. investigation into links between Russia and President Donald Trump’s 2016 election campaign will testify next week before a Republican-led Senate committee examining the origins of the probe, the panel said on Wednesday.

Former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who appointed former U.S. Special Counsel Robert Mueller in 2017, will testify on June 3 as part of a Senate Judiciary Committee examination of an FBI probe of Trump campaign officials code-named “Crossfire Hurricane,” which led to the Mueller investigation.

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham said Rosenstein would offer “new revelations” about federal surveillance practices.

Trump and his Republican allies claim the probe was intended to undermine his candidacy and presidency. In December, a Justice Department watchdog found evidence of numerous errors but no political bias when the FBI opened the probe.

“Even the best law enforcement officers make mistakes and … some engage in willful misconduct,” Rosenstein said in a statement on Wednesday.

“We can only hope to maintain public confidence if we correct mistakes, hold wrongdoers accountable and adopt policies to prevent problems from recurring,” he added.

The Rosenstein hearing is set a day before the Senate Judiciary Committee will vote whether to subpoena Rosenstein, former FBI Director James Comey and other former top officials from the Obama administration, as part of its probe.

The panel’s top Democrat, Senator Dianne Feinstein, has sharply criticized the committee investigation as an effort to attack Trump political rival Joe Biden, the presumptive 2020 Democratic presidential nominee.

The Mueller probe found that Russia sought to interfere in the 2016 election to boost Trump’s candidacy and that the Trump campaign had numerous contacts with Russians. But Mueller concluded that there was not enough evidence to establish a criminal conspiracy between the Trump campaign and Moscow.

This article was originally published on reuters.com.

Home of Science
Follow me

Latest posts by Home of Science (see all)
- Advertisement -

Discover

Sponsor

Latest

Some states reopen for business, but big chains remain hesitant to open their doors

As some states lurch toward restarting their economies after coronavirus closures, many big companies remain hesitant to open their doors. Macy’s Inc. M, +2.65% , Gap Inc. GPS, -2.81% and TGI...

How Olivia Winfrey Has Affected Television Today

Oprah Winfrey, America's most popular and well known female talk show host, is the most recognized name in all media, and is the namesake...

Target’s soaring online growth suggests scared shoppers may not return when malls and department stores reopen

Malls and other retailers are slowly beginning to reopen, but that doesn’t mean consumers are lining up to shop. In fact, if Target Corp.’s TGT, +3.81% skyrocketing digital...

Here’s how the coronavirus could sink Trump’s environmental deregulation push

Resize icon The Trump administration’s rollback of what it says are burdensome wetland and auto regulations could run into an unexpected and powerful foe:...

How the pandemic may change the way we grocery shop

KEY POINTS Mask-wearing and one-way aisles may fade away, but analysts say the pandemic will change how customers stock their fridges and how grocers...
Home of Science
Follow me
Latest posts by Home of Science (see all)