The Main Causes of Mesothelioma

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mesothelioma Causes

The Main Causes of Mesothelioma

Mesothelioma Causes are a combination of different symptoms and diseases that afflict the victims of this deadly disease. Symptoms from a mesothelioma case will include shortness of breath, persistent chest pain, abdominal and back pain, fatigue, nausea, and weight loss.

The different causes of mesothelioma have caused a lot of confusion and controversy among doctors. What we know about the causes are; exposure to asbestos fibers, exposure to molds and other toxic substances, exposure to chemicals like insecticides, disinfectants, herbicides, and fungicides, inhalation of toxic chemicals, exposure to cigarette smoke, and prolonged exposure to radiation or cancer causing chemicals. It is estimated that more than 3000 new cases of mesothelioma are diagnosed in the United States each year.

Mesothelioma causes range from relatively rare to the most common of all. The numbers of mesothelioma cause and their different levels are listed below. While all of these symptoms can be present in some patients at the same time, there is no single cause for all cases of mesothelioma.

Although individual cases may not seem to have any connection, when a researcher looks closer at them, they usually find that they all seem to have one thing in common. This common link is that all of the causes of mesothelioma, whether they are common or rare, are all related to cancer cells.

Common causes of mesothelioma include: inhalation of asbestos, exposure to molds, exposure to chemicals, and exposure to cigarette smoke. While these cause of cancer are all potentially dangerous, not all are dangerous enough to be fatal.

Another common causes of mesothelioma is that of long-term exposure to radiation. While the direct effects of radiation are never fatal, it has been shown that repeated exposure can lead to permanent tumors in the abdominal region, as well as cancer of the thyroid gland.

Less common causes of mesothelioma are: exposure to radioactive materials, which can include long-term exposure to fallout from nuclear weapons, as well as chronic exposure to radon gas. While not all are immediately lethal, the cancer risk is considerable for those who are exposed to high levels of radiation for long periods of time.

Mesothelioma causes are usually determined based on many factors including; the type of cancer that was discovered, age, gender, geographic location, and family history. Since these three factors are such a good indicator of a family history of mesothelioma, it is often assumed that if a person in the family has had the disease, they also will have the same symptoms that are common to all. This is not always the case, however, since many cases of mesothelioma can be found in young adults that have no direct family history of the disease.

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