Carbon dioxide emitted by factories used to make soap

Turn carbon dioxide emissions produced by industry into potassium chloride to be used for soap and detergents: this is the idea that originated at Clean02, a Canadian start-up based in Calgary that attracted the attention of many industries in the sector.

One of these is the Jill Hawker soap factory, which started mixing potassium chloride by putting it in the soap factory. At the moment, the procedure is still in the testing phase, but Hawker himself states on the CBC website that the procedure does not seem to cause any particular problems and that with potassium chloride it is possible to make “truly functional” soaps.

The collapse of potassium comes from the production lines of Clean02, a company that has developed a specific technology to transform the CO2 that can be produced, for example in the furnaces and boilers of potash industries that can be used to make different types of soap.

Even the same Canadian natural resources, Canada’s largest oil and natural gas producer, seems to be extremely beneficial for supplying the CO2 that is currently trying to store underground so that it can be exploited. Steve Laut, executive vice president of the company, said that “CO2 is carbon and oxygen.” These are not scary molecules. They are not radioactive or similar,” a statement that suggests that any technologies or ideas that could be used to exploit it are welcome.

In the Clean02 process, the CO2 is absorbed by a particular chemical, a type of hydroxide. At the end of the process, large quantities of potassium are produced, a substance that can be sold because it is extremely useful in some sectors; the profit can be shared between the same Clean02 and the CO2 producer.


See also:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/cleano2-cnrl-soap-carbinx-1.5265780

Image source:

https://blogs.ei.columbia.edu/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/Apollo_Beach_power_plant_01432.jpg

Kelly Owen

Kelly majored in English Literature and is responsible for assisting in proofreading, editing and research, as well as for web design and the maintenance of this website. Beyond her outstanding writing skills, she has like the rest of us a passion for science and science reporting. She is an avid reader of many scientific journals and magazines, especially Scientific American. In her spare time she also enjoys reading fiction and hopes to complete her own novel in 2020.
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