Eggs used to produce hydrogen and graphene

In a study of researchers from the Ulsan National Institute of Sciences and Technology (UNIST), a team of researchers presents the possibility of using eggshells as a catalyst to produce hydrogen and graphene.

The researchers, led by Jong-Beom Baek, used calcium oxide in the laboratory with calcium carbonate (the main ingredients of eggshells) and discovered that these materials can be used as catalysts at a lower temperature than that of conventional catalysts.

The chemical reaction sees a layer of thin carbon inserted over the calcium oxide to form graphene. The latter can then be easily removed. With other reactions pure hydrogen can also be obtained. In the press release on the Korean Institute’s website, they talk about “three birds with one stone: with this procedure, we can obtain value-added hydrogen and graphene using a technique that recycles food waste such as eggshells.”

“Calcium oxide is a cheap material and is ecological because it can be produced from recycled eggshells,” says Baek himself. “Both hydrogen and graphene are cheap because they can be used without any separation process.”


See also:

https://news.unist.ac.kr/new-technique-converts-eggshells-into-bulky-nanoporous-graphene-and-pure-hydrogen/

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/adma.201807267

Image source:

https://www.personalcaredentistry.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/iStock-465425596-eggshells.jpg

Kelly Owen

Kelly majored in English Literature and is responsible for assisting in proofreading, editing and research, as well as for web design and the maintenance of this website. Beyond her outstanding writing skills, she has like the rest of us a passion for science and science reporting. She is an avid reader of many scientific journals and magazines, especially Scientific American. In her spare time she also enjoys reading fiction and hopes to complete her own novel in 2020.
---
520-557-5143
[email protected]
Kelly Owen