Waste from carbon monoxide used to make useful organic compounds

The technologies behind the reuse of carbon oxides produced by industrial processes, in particular those using fossil fuels, are becoming increasingly efficient as the number of studies carried out by scientists in this field increases.

In this context, research is being carried out by Feng Jiao, Professor of Chemical Engineering and Bio at the University of Delaware. Already a leader in carbon capture and reuse, Jiao is leading a team in a study that could take the whole sector a step further.

The study, published in Nature Chemistry, describes how the researcher and his team were able to use a particular electrochemical carbon monoxide reduction reaction to make amides, which are considered to be high-performance industrial chemicals. Amides are compounds that can, in fact, be used in different sectors, even in the pharmaceutical sector.

The researchers used an electrochemical current reactor fed with carbon monoxide and ammonia, a compound that contains nitrogen and which represents the real novelty of this process. Only nitrogen causes the interaction with the catalyst made of copper which leads to the formation of carbon-nitrogen bonds. The process then made it possible to sinter amides.


See also:

https://www.udel.edu/udaily/2019/august/feng-jiao-carbon-nitrogen-bonds-catalysis/

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41557-019-0312-z

Image source:

https://static.independent.co.uk/s3fs-public/thumbnails/image/2017/12/15/13/coal-power-plant.jpg

Kelly Owen

Kelly majored in English Literature and is responsible for assisting in proofreading, editing and research, as well as for web design and the maintenance of this website. Beyond her outstanding writing skills, she has like the rest of us a passion for science and science reporting. She is an avid reader of many scientific journals and magazines, especially Scientific American. In her spare time she also enjoys reading fiction and hopes to complete her own novel in 2020.
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